Pattern Review of Butterick 5529

In this post I will review Butterick 5529. I used this pattern to sew an evening jacket designed to go with a blue satin and lace dress (see more of my design process at: Design It: Sew an Evening Cover Up ). I opted for view C which is a loose fitting jacket with no closures, it has kimono sleeves and a centre back seam. The recommended fabrics were crepe, sheer fabric, jersey, light weight velvet, jacquard or brocade. I chose to use a sheer organza with floral embroidered but as I wanted to wear this jacket to keep the chills away I opted to line it with a blue satin.

sew an evening jacket
My design. Lace dress worn with Butterick 5529 view C. Adobe Illustrator sketch.

Here I will give my opinion on Butterick 5529, show you how I added a lining and take you through the pattern instructions step by step.

Butterick 5229 - pattern envelope front
Butterick 5229 – pattern envelope front

What I used:

  • Floral Organza
  • Blue satin
  • Blue thread
  • White thread
  • Sew in Interfacing
Floral fabric
Floral fabric to be used in my evening jacket. See more about where I found my fabric at See It: Fabric Finds Whilst Shopping in Spain

Make a toile:

Before I cut into my fabric I made a toile to check the fit. I cut a medium size. I found that the jacket fit as it should and required no adaptations. However, the collar was a couple of cm short which meant that it didn’t meet the bottom edge of the jacket (see picture below). Therefore, when I cut the collar pattern piece I added a couple of cm to the length.

Sew a toile.

My pattern adaptations:

The first change I made to my pattern was to increase the seam allowance, this was because I was using satin which is prone to fraying. I added 1 cm to each of the seams and the hem so the SA was 2.5 cm in total. This gave me enough space to trim away the frayed areas and made it easier to feed the slippery satin through the machine.

Here is a tutorial on how to sew with satin How to Sew with Satin

My second adaptation was to add a lining to the jacket. To do this I cut 2 of each pattern piece, 1 in the satin and one in the floral organza.

I cut 2 of each pattern piece, 1 in the satin and one in the floral organza.

For each pattern piece I basted the satin lining to the floral fabric with the RS of the satin to WS of the organza. I used a 4 mm stitch length, a 1 cm SA and I reduced the stitch tension.

Baste the floral fabric to the satin

From this point onwards I treated the basted fabric pieces as one and followed the instructions stated in the pattern.

How to sew Butterick 5529:

Here are the instructions that were provided with Butterick 5529. I have taken pictures after each stage, to illustrate each point.

The pattern says to use a 1.5 cm SA unless otherwise stated (although I was using a 2.5 cm SA).

  1. Stitch the two back fabric sections together using a French seam. Press the centre back seam to one side.
    • The pattern does provide a guide on how to sew French seams, however as I increased my SA I had to adapt the method. I sewed a 1.5 cm seam, trimmed back the SA and then enclosed the raw edges within a 1 cm seam.
    • Read my tutorial if you are not too sure of how to sew a French seamHow to Sew a French Seam
Sew the two back fabric sections together using a French seam

2. Pin and sew the front to the back along the shoulder/over arm sleeves. Use french seams.

 

    Sew the front to the back along the shoulder/over arm sleeves.
    Sew the front to the back along the shoulder/over arm sleeves.

    3. Stitch the side and underarm sleeves. Reinforce the curve of underarm. Clip as necessary and press open.

    • To reinforce or strengthen your seams sew a second row of stitches along the seam line. Use a short stitch length.
    • I finished this seam with a zig zag stitch as I didn’t want to have ugly frayed edges on the inside of my garment.
    Sew the underarm seam

    4. Turn the sleeve up to hem. Baste close to fold. Trim hem to an even width. Turn under ¼” (6mm) on raw edge; press. Baste close to upper pressed edge. Topstitch hem in place along upper basting.

    • I didn’t actually hem the sleeve in the manner suggested. I didn’t bother with any of the basting. Instead I turned the hem under once by 1 cm and then turned it under again by 1.5 cm. I marked these distances on the WS using chalk. To secure the hem in place I topstitched 1 cm from the bottom of the sleeve.

    5. Turn up the hem along the lower edge. Baste close to fold. Trim hem to an even width. Turn under ¼” (6mm) on raw edge; press. Baste close to upper pressed edge. Topstitch hem in place along upper basting.

    • As before with the sleeve I didn’t actually hem the lower edge in the manner suggested. I didn’t bother with any of the basting. Instead I turned the hem under once by 1 cm and then turned it under again by 1.5 cm. I marked these distances on the WS using chalk. To secure the hem in place I topstitched 1 cm from the bottom of the sleeve.
    Hem the lower edge
    Hem the lower edge

    6. Pin interfacing to the WS of the front and back band. Baste in place.

    Baste interfacing to the WS of front and back band

    7. Stitch front and back band together at the notched end.

     

    Sew front and back band together
    Stitch front and back band together

    8. Turn in the unmarked edge of the front and back band by 1.5 cm and press. Trim the pressed edge to 3/8” (1cm).

    Turn in the unmarked edge of the front and back band by 1.5 cm

    9) With RST pin the front and back band to the neck and front opening edges. Match notches and triangles. Stitch in place. Trim the seam and press towards the band.

    • Take your time to match the centre back seam of the collar with the back seam of the jacket. You want this to be fairly precise as it will be pretty obvious if its wonky.
    • When joining the collar to the jacket, I started sewing from the centre back seam rather than from the lower edge of the jacket. This helped to make sure the two back seams were perfectly aligned.
    Butterick 5529
    Sew collar to the jacket. Make sure to match the centre back seams

    10) At lower edges, turn front and back band to the outside, along the fold line. Stitch 5/8” or 1.5cm from lower edge; trim.

    • Personally, I found this instruction a little unclear so I will do my best to explain it… Fold the collar/band along the fold line, RST.  Sew the bottom edges of the band, RST. This should mean that when you turn the collar/band the right side out the lower raw edges are concealed within the band.

    11) Turn the band to the inside along the fold line (or turn the band right side out). Slip stitch the pressed edge over the seam.

    • When you slipstitch the collar closed you want to make sure all the raw edges from sewing the band to the jacket are hidden.
    • If you didn’t fancy hand stitching you could always use the stitch in the ditch technique instead.
    Slip stitch the band to the jacket.

    My opinion of the Butterick 5529:

    The outside of the pattern envelope:

    • The illustrations and technical drawings of view C are a good representation of the garment that I made. The jacket looks as I expected it to, it has a loose fit with large kimono sleeves.
    • The recommended fabrics are crepe, sheer fabric, jersey, light weight velvet, jacquard and brocade.
    • According to the size chart I was a medium and overall I was quite happy with the fit. Due to the loose nature of the garment there was a lot more leeway in the fit and therefore no adjustments were required.
    • The organza I used was 45” wide, the pattern suggested I needed to use 1 ¾ m . The satin I used was 60 “ wide, the required length for this project was 1 1/8 m. I would say this is a fair estimation. I didn’t have tons of fabric left over at the end but I wasn’t left needing more either.

    Inside the pattern envelope:

    Inside the pattern envelope there is lots of information to help make reading the pattern and preparing your fabric really easy to understand. There is a guide on how to layout your pattern on the fabric and instructions on how to cut out the fabric sections. Additionally, there is a key which helps to explain the diagrams that are used, this includes codes for RS, WS, interfacing and lining. It also has illustrations to show how to trim enclosed seams into layers, trim corners and trim curves. It also has definitions on sewing terms such as ease stitch, edge stitch and reinforce etc.

    The difficulty rating of Butterick 5529:

    Butterick have given this pattern a difficulty rating of easy and I would agree. I think view C is a fairly simple garment to make, it didn’t require any difficult skills and would be suitable for a beginner. There were no closures to think about, which makes it a great jacket for beginners as there were no daunting buttonholes or zips. It is also great for someone who wants a quick project that doesn’t require hours upon hours of your time. Although the pattern is fairly simple you could use it as an opportunity to give yourself a challenge and work with new fabrics such as sheers, velvet or jersey.

    The pattern instructions:

    Overall I found the pattern instructions for Butterick 5529 clear and easy to follow. There are diagrams throughout to help illustrate each step and descriptions on how to complete techniques such as French seams.

    Diagram from Butterick 5529 which illustrates how to sew the centre back seam of the jacket.

    Other comments:

    The instructions for Butterick 5529 view C and D are exactly the same except for the finishing step. Unlike view C, view D finishes the collar/band with a ribbon.

    There are lots of tutorials on the internet on how to draft your own kimono pattern. Retrospectively, I question whether I could have just made the pattern myself and saved the money of buying one.

    If you are interested in making Butterick 5529 view E you should be made aware that the pattern piece is just a rectangle. Therefore, I wouldn’t recommend spending the money for this look. Personally, I would feel a little cheated as you are just paying for the instructions. If you did want to make look E, perhaps check to see if there is a tutorial on the internet on how to make this first.

    My opinion on my make:

    I was a little nervous about sewing the satin however, in this case it was really simple. As I was sewing it as one with the floral fabric it didn’t distort or move around at all. The texture and rigidity of the floral fabric stabilised it. On the other hand, the floral fabric didn’t press at all which meant that the hems and collar look a little bit untidy.

    I really liked my fabric combination and was pleased with the finished garment. As you can see the jacket really complements the blue dress!!!

    My jacket!
    My jacket paired with my satin and lace dress.
    I wore my jacket to a wedding! I think it looks great!